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U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Tylerruben Salas, small arms repair technician for Marine Corps Base Camp Blaz, conducts rifle, pre-fire inspections before shooting on Marine Corps Base Camp Blaz, Guam, Sept. 25, 2023. The Marine Corps’ Program Manager for Training Systems will conduct target calibration from Sept. 25 to Oct. 27 and testing from Dec. 4-15. Two of four ranges at the Live Fire Training Range Complex will be equipped with new technology that provide more efficient and effective combat marksmanship training to support combat readiness. The live-fire location of miss and hit or LOMAH technology, replaces the human element of observing and marking targets. The calibration and testing are to ensure that the LOMAH system is working properly. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Garrett Gillespie)

Photo by LCpl. Garrett Gillespie

Camp Blaz Live Fire Training Range Complex Calibration

20 Feb 2024 | Lance Cpl. Garrett Gillespie Marine Corps Base Camp Blaz

As Marine Corps Base Camp Blaz continues getting closer to becoming fully operational in the Indo-Pacific. Training facilities are also nearing completion. Marine Corps Systems Commands Program Manager for Training Systems has started conducting target calibration from Sept. 25 to Oct. 27 and live-fire testing Nov. 27 to Dec. 15. This marks the very first live-fire activity at the Live-Fire-Training-Range-Complex and will start the establishment of the safety buffer area to ensure public safety when the ranges are being used.

Soldiers with the 368th military police company in Guam arrived at the ranges on Sept. 25, 2023. The day began with a counting of rifles that was provided by the unit.

U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Tylerruben Salas, a small arms repair technician for Marine Corps Base Camp Blaz conducted pre-fire inspections and cleaning to ensure the operation and precision of the rifles were on point and ready for the start of live-firing.

“This was a very fulfilling experience being a part of the first live-fire event and being able to do my duties as Camp Blaz’s armorer,” said Salas, a native of Midland, Texas. “Seeing all the hard work from constructing these ranges come to life is a great feeling.”

After the Soldiers received a safety brief, loaded on their equipment, took their positions, and loaded their magazines; it was time to send the long awaited first round down range.

 “This was a very fulfilling experience being a part of the first live-fire event and being able to do my duties as Camp Blaz’s armorer,” U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Tylerruben Salas, a small arms repair technician

The Soldiers went on to fire several relays, between each one, contractors with Theissen Target Systems measured shot groups to make sure the Location of Miss and Hit system was working as it should.

To enhance combat readiness, two out of four LFTRC ranges are equipped with the LOMAH system.

The system replaces the traditional method of human observation and target marking. By providing instantaneous feedback to the shooter, LOMAH aims to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of combat marksmanship training. It works by a single bar that is strategically placed on the target to detect the vibration caused by a round hitting the surface. This data is then combined with information on the round's speed, which is recorded by a laser at the firing line. Testing includes comprehensive evaluations to ensure that the system is reacting precisely to rounds hitting the target and capturing accurate data.

The soldiers maintained a steady shot group throughout the calibration, which led to accurate readings for the calibration testing.

“Anywhere we normally go to do range specific things, range control is already established, and here we are building it from the ground up,” said Jeremy La Force, range and training planner for 3rd Marine Expeditionary Force’s Defense Policy and Review Initiative Division. “The system is operating the way we expected.”

Calibration will continue from Sept. 25 to Oct. 27 and live-fire testing is expected to occur from Nov. 27 to Dec. 15., to ensure the systems are prepared for the thousands of service members that will be training and qualifying over the next decades. The LOMAH system marks a significant advancement in combat marksmanship training. The system's ability to provide instantaneous and accurate feedback to shooters revolutionizes the training process, eliminating the need for human observers and enhancing combat readiness. Military personnel can make immediate adjustments to their marksmanship techniques, improving precision and overall effectiveness.


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